Bryden Allen's Website

My Activities


my activities coverHere I will tell you what the photos in this picture (on the right) are all about. (A higher resolution version of this picture can be seen in my   “Green Living - book”(pdf) at the end (the back cover).)
            I will start with the central photograph. Then I will go clockwise around the outside photographs - starting at the top left of this picture.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bryden climbing toyland1) Myself Climbing
            This photo (left) was taken when I was 58 –  a year before my accident. The climb I was doing was Toyland, which is a classic three star climb at Cosmic County (Blue Mountains) of grade 25.
            I normally climb in the old-fashioned manner and so I do a climb “on sight”. But for this particular ascent I did the climb as a “project” – so I worked on the climb for several weekends with a top rope with different partners. Then finally I led the climb from the bottom as shown.
            Some climbers disapprove of this type of ascent. But I think that this technique can be very beneficial to a person’s climbing ability. It teaches a climber how to rest many times in very awkward situations on a hard climb. I recommend that all climbers should do at least one “project” climb in their climbing lives. It gives a climber a very different experience in climbing. (A climber will normally choose a “project” climb that is at least two grades harder than the hardest grade they climb “on sight”.)
            This climb was photographed by Simon Carter (a professional climbing photographer) and it appeared in Rock magazine. He, of course, did a superb job.
            A complete account of my climbing activities is given inMy Climbing.

Our route up Balls Pyramid

 

 

 

 

2) Ball’s Pyramid
            I led the first ascent of this iconic pinnacle near Lord Howe Island in 1965. I describe this ascent in First Ascent of the Face of Bluff Mountain. The Profile of Bryden Allen”(pdf) article also covers the ascent reasonably well. Also Jack Pettigrew in his website gives further details. The ascent took many days so it takes several pages to describe. Of course the ascent was a superb adventure.

            (The sub-picture in the main picture is actually completely wrong. I had carelessly forgotten the details. So I marked the north ridge rather than the south ridge.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bryden and two oldest children in the snow3) Myself and my two oldest children in the snow
            I, like most people, have happily spent a large amount of my time in normal family activities. (Eventually my scrapbook will contain these details.) This is be described in My Life.

 

 

 

 

Our route up Frenchman's Cap

 

4) Frenchman’s Cap
            This photo shows the first ascent route that Jack Pettigrew and I made of this great face in 1964. The details of this ascent can be seen and read in my First Ascent of the Face of Frenchman’s Cap. The site “Chockstone” also gives further details of the route.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

morris dancing5) My Morris Team
            I formed this Morris team in 1988 – we called ourselves the Black Wattle Morris. We practised weekly, and we performed publically on the streets and at folk festivals for the next 7 or 8 years. I would still engage in this activity if I could. This is described in my Dancing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sydney harbour bridge6) The Sydney Harbour Bridge
            The wonderful feature of this climb is that the climbing party initially squeezes between the struts to enter the hanging pillars (which support the road lanes and railways). But once inside, a climber is completely hidden – so the various officials can’t see the climbing party. The climb still has a really hard crux associated with getting onto the arch structure. The details are given in my Illegal Direct Ascent of Sydney Harbour Bridge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sydney town hall7)  The Sydney Town Hall
            The illegal climbing of public buildings at night is a wonderful sport. And I became a little addicted to the activity. I started this activity when I was at university in London at UCL. Our college had a little guide of its building climbs. This guide had 8 climbs in it when I arrived. I added 4 new routes to the guide. They were all good routes (for most of these routes we used top-ropes).
            The climb up the Sydney Town Hall is also a wonderful route. The details are given in Illegal Ascent of Sydney Town Hall + Clock-Tower.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bryden performing8) Myself - Performing on my Box
            This activity is described in detail in my A Special Period to stop Climate Change - book”(pdf) (chapter 1).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the running set dance9) The The Running Set
            The Running Set is an old folk-dance from the Appalachian mountain area. The dance is done to a running step so it is reasonably fast. The dance has 17 figures and takes an hour to perform. So the performance of this dance makes a magnificent challenge. So I formed a group to do this dance. We performed this dance on the stage at Darling Harbour once, as well as at various folk festivals over a period over about 10 years. It really is a superb dance and it gives everyone a perfect physical workout.
  

         

lands dept clocktower10) The Lands Department Clock-Tower
            This is the hardest of the three clock-towers I have climbed. Our first attempt was a disaster. This is all described in Illegal Ascents of Sydney’s most Iconic Buildings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

centrepoint tower11) Centre-Point
            This ascent was an even more complex affair than the Lands Department clock-tower. I give the full details of this ascent are in the “Illegal Ascents of Sydney’s most Iconic Buildings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

central railway clocktower12) The Central-Railway Clock-Tower
            This was the first clock-tower which we climbed (I climbed it with John Davis). This clock-tower is relatively straightforward to climb and is described in my Illegal Ascents of Sydney’s most Iconic Buildings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My next normal webpage is: "Forming a Website like this".

 

          You might now also like to look back at:

my "Home Page" (which introduces this whole website and lists all my webpages).

 

Updated on 14/11/2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can click on any of the following pictures and this will send you to the relevant webpage.